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1/18/2018 » 1/19/2018
ANNUAL TECHNICAL SEMINAR

7/19/2018 » 7/21/2018
2018 ANNUAL MEETING & SUMMER CONVENTION

Four-year degree
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2/9/2017 at 1:50:01 PM GMT
Posts: 5
I agree that time in the field is important. I don't think that just having a degree is the only answer. We need young Surveyors to not only become educated in the classroom, but to become educated under the guidance of a seasoned Surveyor in the field and office. We need both.

My point above was that things have changed, and we need more than just an apprentice program. I agree that there are some very fine Surveyors out there who do not have a college degree. I think that formal college level education will be of great benefit to the individual, and be of great benefit to our profession.

Just my 2 cents.

Dale Yawn


2/21/2017 at 3:08:06 PM GMT
Posts: -3
I agree education is important in our profession. I could probably get behind an associates degree requirement in math with the 15 hours of surveying included. If we make a four year degree requirement I believe it would be a mistake. Students would pretty much have a degree in civil engineering after 4 years. Then they would need to work for at least 4 years starting as a rodman digging up pins and cutting line. That is the only way to learn land surveying.

I believe we could solve a lot of the problems in surveying if the RLS would go in the field more and stop sending field crews to do surveys that are distance measurers and don't understand the nuances of our great profession. What good will it be if we mandate a bachelors degree and the field work continues to be done by everybody but the graduate?


2/21/2017 at 3:08:42 PM GMT
Posts: 3
I agree education is important in our profession. I could probably get behind an associates degree requirement in math with the 15 hours of surveying included. If we make a four year degree requirement I believe it would be a mistake. Students would pretty much have a degree in civil engineering after 4 years. Then they would need to work for at least 4 years starting as a rodman digging up pins and cutting line. That is the only way to learn land surveying.

I believe we could solve a lot of the problems in surveying if the RLS would go in the field more and stop sending field crews to do surveys that are distance measurers and don't understand the nuances of our great profession. What good will it be if we mandate a bachelors degree and the field work continues to be done by everybody but the graduate?


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