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Question regarding new plat recording rules
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12/19/2016 at 11:12:53 PM GMT
Posts: 16
Question regarding new plat recording rules

Any and all help would be appreciated in response to the following questions:

Will I be able to record a plat from my office using the Clerk's e-file portal, or do I have to use a vendor?  If I can record from my office directly to the GSCCCA site, who needs a vendor in the first place?  I thought I had to use a vendor to record a plat from my office, or physically go to the Clerk's office and use their public terminal. 

The sample plat was very helpful and I appreciate those who spent so much time putting it together.



12/22/2016 at 1:56:13 PM GMT
Posts: 1
Steve,
Plats will still have to be delivered to the Court Clerk in paper & electronic form so that they can place the recording information on them such as date, Plat Book, Page No., etc. and they are to provide a terminal to transfer the tiff file to the state. Hope this helps.


1/5/2017 at 2:09:08 PM GMT
Posts: 1
Based on our correspondence with local clerk's office, no paper copies will be required except as necessary to get local approval from P&Z, health department, et cetera. The recording information will be placed on the plat in the 3"x 3" box by the clerk electronically after we record the plat through the e-file portal.

The onerous part of this new rule is the requirement that we, as surveyors, first determine what local approvals are required and get them placed on the plat (or get signatures stating that approvals are not required, which is the exact same thing). Our work to put documents on record is going to triple. When we try to recover our costs from clients, many of them will decide not to have their plats recorded. The new rules have probably reduced the number of plats that will be put on record by 50%. Get ready to see a huge increase in deeds with long written legal descriptions and a reduction of the publicly-available information regarding property transactions.


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